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YWCA participates in Wyoming Community Foundation challenge

Categories: News

This story is part of the Wyoming Community Foundations challenge to get community members to vote for 1 of 3 local non-profit organizations, including the YWCA of Sweetwater County, the Boys & Girls Club of Sweetwater County, and CLIMB Wyoming.  The non-profit with the most votes will receive a $500 grant provided by Searle Brothers Construction.

YWCA Success Story:

Kelly and her two Children came to the CFC shelter and needed help getting her and her children out of a verbally and mentally abusive home.
While in our shelter Kelly completed a YWCA financial class to help her learn how to be independent, make a budget, and increase financial understanding. She learned the skills to live on her own and raise her children with success. After a brief stay, Kelly found an apartment. We helped her move and with transportation.

Kelly had saved enough money while in our home, she was able to buy a vehicle for her and her children. We then helped register and license the car.
In the meantime, Kelly has stayed working and maintaining her home. We also helped with repairs to her car, so she’s up and running now. Kelly has been a great success to us. She shows with hard work and determination and a little bit of help, that anything is possible.

“I WOULD RECOMMEND PEOPLE TO THE CFC IF THEY NEED HELP AND IF I EVER NEED HELP AGAIN, I WOULD GO THERE.
A BIG THANKS TO ALL THE NEW AND OLD CFC EMPLOYEES, REALLY GREAT PROGRAM. NOW I’M FULLY BACK ON MY FEET AND FEEL LIKE A GOOD MOM AGAIN AND SAFE.”
-KELLY, YWCA CARE RECIPIENT

My stay at the shelter was great. I was really worried my 2 kids wouldn’t be able to do anything for Christmas, but thanks to the YWCA CFC, we were able to have a place to stay.

The CFC employees were really friendly, they introduced themselves and showed me around. They asked me if the room I got was ok. It was just me and my kids for a while, then a lot of people came and went, so my anxiety was high. They told me I didn’t have to go upstairs or out of my room if I was uncomfortable. That helped my anxiety go down.

They helped with a lot of stuff. They worked with helping me get a job. When I needed to stay longer, they let me.  They helped me get a place of my own and helped with grocery shopping. Even when I moved out and got my own place. Even though I had moved out, they still helped me. They helped me get the parts to fix my van so I could have reliable transportation for my kids.

Before that they helped with bus passes so I could get around. I felt comfortable, safe, secure, and at home living in the shelter. They also always checked on my kids and I make sure we were ok and if I needed anything.
They paid bills and groceries and all that stuff we needed while there. Also donated a lot of stuff for my new place.

I really loved how close my kids and I got to some of the CFC employees. They are really great people and very helpful. I would recommend people to the CFC if they need help and if I ever need help again, I would go there.
A big THANKS to all the new and old CFC employees, really great program. Now I’m fully back on my feet and feel like a good mom again and safe.”

HOW YOU WOULD USE THE $500 GRANT PROVIDED BY SEARLE BROTHERS?

YWCA provides services to families in Sweetwater County through the Early Care and Learning Center (ECLC), the Center for Families and Children (CFC), and the Financial Empowerment Program (FE). Through these programs, YWCA provides a variety of support and resources to parents who need a safe, loving structured environment for their children, to those in financial distress, and to victims of all forms of family violence including domestic violence, elder abuse, sexual assault, stalking, dating violence, and human tracking.

YWCA would use the $500 grant from the Searle Brothers to sponsor the “Learn, Grow, Eat & Go!” program that would benefit both the Early Care and Learning Center and service receivers who stay in the Shelter.

This program is a garden, nutrition, and physical activity intervention working to prevent childhood obesity. The children will learn about healthy foods, how to grow them, and how they can help others through their garden.

These gardens will be in a wood like framed box above ground and would be planted and maintained by children 2-12 years of age. In the ECLC, older children will be partnered with the younger children in order to create a mentoring process throughout the Center. At the shelter, parents and children will be encouraged to help maintain the garden while spending outside quality time together.

Fresh fruits and vegetables will be collected by the children to eat as well as be donated as part of the School Aged Program community service project.